HTML5 Audio Test of Browser Dependence on Media Filename

This pair of tests was designed to determine whether browsers rely at all on filename extension to determine media type of HTML5 audio source files, and whether GET parameters included in the URL effect browsers' ability to detect media type. Both of these issues are relevant since various tools and techniques are available for encrypting URLs to make them more secure.

Test #1: Filename Extensions

In this test, the <audio> element includes source files in mp3 and ogg, but neither file is named with those extensions (they use .mxx and .oxx instead).

NOTE: I also added audio/ogg and audio/mpeg MIME types for oxx and mxx extensions in the .htaccess file on my server. So I'm reasonably confident that when the server is asked to serve up an oxx or mxx file, it does so with the appropriate header.

Results

Most recent test: November 30, 2011

Test #2: Parameters in URL

In this test, the <audio> element includes source files in mp3 and ogg, and both have those extensions, but both also have GET parameters in their URL.

Results

Most recent test: November 30, 2011

Conclusion: All current browsers are smart enough to avoid being tripped up by parameters in the URL.

Test #3: Amazon S3 URL

This test uses Amazon S3 URLs that were known to be working at the time of the test. These are dynamically-generated URLs that expire after 40 minutes, so as you're viewing this page now they probably don't work. However, they were tested during the 40-minute window, so any failure is not due to the time having expired.

Results

Most recent test: June 25, 2011