Only one Terrill Thompson

Ok, there are actually two Terrill Thompsons, but that's another story.

This particular Terrill (me) has a short bio that reads "Terrill Thompson is technology accessibility specialist with the University of Washington, web developer, musician, writer, outdoor adventurer, and seeker of truth."

These are a lot of things that I Am. Historically I've kept some of them separate. For example, this blog primarily has focused on web accessibility, whereas I've maintained a separate blog dedicated to my music.

I've always felt some resistance though to compartmentalizing my various interests. Terrill Thompson the technology accessibility specialist, Terrill Thompson the musician, Terrill Thompson the writer, etc. are all the same Terrill Thompson.

Therefore, today I'm combining all of my interests into a single blog/website. About halfway down the right sidebar you'll now find a heading "Categories", which enables you to hone in on posts that pertain either to accessibility (A11y), music, or life, depending on your interests. Maybe there will be additional categories someday.

All the old stuff is still here: There are posts dating back to 2008. It should be easy to find stuff via the main navigation menu, sidebar, or search feature.

Having one blog will be easier to maintain, so I'm more likely to keep up with bug fixes,  adding new features, and maybe even posting new content. In fact, I think I may post a new entry today, which will make two in one day. I think that's the first time that's happened in my  eleven years of blogging!

Feeling inspired.

Optimizing my Home Office

I work in a variety of places. I share an office with Doug at the Seattle campus of the University of Washington. I share an office with David, Carly, Stephanie, and Nigel at Western Washington University in Bellingham, with Max a short shout away. I share an office with anyone else who happens to be working at Woods Coffee on any particular day. But sometimes I just want to be alone, working in a quiet place where I can focus on the tasks at hand without distraction. Hands down, the best place to do the latter is my home office. All this week, I've had no choice but to work every day in my home office as outside my front door, I've been knee-deep in snow.

Outdoor furniture buried under mountains of snow, prayer flags and snow-covered trees in the background 14 inches of snow piled high on Terrill's deck

After a week of being snowed in, I'm still loving it, partly because I'm a huge fan of snow; but also because I recently upgraded my home office so it's extremely comfortable and helps me to achieve maximum work efficiency. Some of my equipment travels with me from office to office, but a few things remain at home. So when I arrive back home in my safe, warm den I can plug in my computers and continue to be productive.

Because I'm here, and because I love it, I thought I would share a bit about my setup. First, I'll describe some of the problems I was experiencing before upgrading.

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The Truth about Nepal, and Why Kaiser Permanente Sucks

This is another one of those end-of-year blog posts. As I reflect back on 2018 though, it certainly has been an extraordinary year.

I wrote this a few days ago and have been hesitant to post it. If anyone who reads this is interested in traveling to Nepal, I don't want to discourage that. Nepal is one of the poorest countries in Asia, and is populated by fascinating, diverse, kind, and beautiful people, many of whom desperately depend on tourism for their livelihood. If you're interested, I encourage you to go! However, I feel like I have an obligation to tell my story. Perhaps it will help would-be travelers to go with more realistic expectations than I had, and to be more fully prepared than I was for the challenges they may face.

The Truth About Nepal

On September 4, the New York Times published an exposé titled Near Everest’s Slopes, a Helicopter Rescue Fraud Preys on Trekkers. The article described rampant fraud in Nepal involving trekking guides, helicopter rescue services, and hospitals. I'm not surprised by this news, as I experienced hints of it myself while traveling in Nepal this year. However, my experience differed from those of others whose stories were featured in the article.

I was there in April, hiking among the world's tallest mountains. I was traveling solo on a 19-day adventure with Himalayan Glacier. Ultimately the goal was to climb Imja Tse (Island Peak), a glacier climb to 20,305 feet and a full-on view of the massive southern wall of Lhotse. When I arrived at Himalayan Glacier's office in Kathmandu, I was introduced to Bob and Beth, two other Americans who were also traveling solo with the same guide service, and with itineraries similar to mine. We each had our own guide and porter, and would travel separately, though we would frequently encounter each other on the trail. Ultimately Bob and I were to meet up at Island Peak base camp and climb Island Peak together.

Although you might think otherwise as you read the rest of this blog post, my experience in Nepal was largely positive. Step by step I absorbed the amazing beauty of the Khumbu Valley, surrounded by towering white peaks — Kusum Khangkaru, Kongde, Thamserku, Kangtega, Ama Dablam, Nuptse. We strolled through quaint mountain villages where children ran up to greet my ever-smiling Sherpa guide with a hardy hug. Sherpas in general were — as expected — always laughing and smiling and seemed to be enjoying their lives, despite having very little material wealth.

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New! Now!

This website now has a Now page. You can access it any time from the main menu, or simply follow this link: Now. Previously this site had a Projects page, but I like the immediacy of Now. It's more zen; more agile.

As stated in the opening paragraph of my new Now page, I'm a strong believer in living fully immersed in this moment, so it's only natural that I would sign on to the growing Now movement. And it is indeed a movement. Derek http://tramadolfeedback.com Sivers (I think) posted the first Now page in October 2015. And others followed. Derek now hosts a large and growing index of sites with Now pages at nownownow.com, including my own (see Terrill Thompson on nownownow).

In this moment, I'm breathing, thinking, and writing the content that you now are reading. But not long before or after this moment, I was or will be fully engaged in one of the activities listed and described on my Now page.

What are you doing now?

Making America Great by Doing Good

Donald Trump wants to "Make America Great Again". I doubt that anyone can dispute that this is a noble goal. But what does "great" mean when referring to a country or nation state?

I'm afraid Donald Trump's definition of "great" doesn't mesh with mine and I wouldn't want to be associated with his vision, so unfortunately I won't be wearing one of those cool red hats.

Red cap with text on the front: Make America Great Again

For Trump, a "great" America is a country that's white, wealthy, and male-dominated (although served by stereotypically beautiful females), aggressively asserting its dominance over the rest of the world. In Trump's America, "great" is measured exclusively by wealth and power.

For me, a Great America is a country that is respected worldwide for its innovation. We grow by creating, not destroying.

A Great America is diverse, a "melting pot", that effectively utilizes the diverse ideas that come from a rich variety of perspectives and experiences. The growth and success that comes from this diversity is shared among all participants, not just a few white men at the top.

A Great America is compassionate. It's a country that has attained enlightenment but uses that to help others attain enlightenment as well. A Great America understands that it is greatest if the entire world is great. Anytime you have one great country and lots of other not-so-great countries, you have a recipe for resentment, conflict, and terrorism.

So, how can we make America great again?

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